Status Quo Agreement Holy Sepulchre

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Status Quo Agreement Holy Sepulchre

The Turkish government has not found a satisfactory solution to the dispute and the case has been held in the position that neither side should be repaired with the agreement of the other party and after notification to the government, and in the event of disagreement, any essential work should be carried out by the government at public expense. The Turkish government of course avoided it as much as possible, which resulted in the dilapidated state of the chapel in the present day. Today, the current situation is a turbulent status quo, a kind of fragile compromise achieved in several stages through the mediation of the Ottoman Empire and several European powers. My favorite example of the status quo is the ladder that rests on the exterior wall of the Holy Sepulchre, just under one of the second-floor windows of the church. It was used nearly 200 years ago to transport food to Armenian monks locked in the church. As the situation is frozen, probably forever, the ladder seems to remain until the ravages of time and time lead it to disintegrate. The aedile is known as the “status quo agreement.” The ladder then became “still” because the six ecclesiastical groups had to consent to be displaced. Do not take further action until these powers reach an agreement between them, if they re-enact the issue and try to find a satisfactory solution for all parties. For this historic building, the “status quo” agreement is maintained. Looks like the still ladder is here to stay. As a general rule, when minor difficulties come beyond the hours of the service agreement, between superiors who are willing to work together to ensure good order and avoid misunderstandings. But it is difficult to think of another solution for the Ottomans.

They faced governments of greater firepower and used religious disputes in Jerusalem to advance their strategic interests. Britain had to maintain the safe passage of trade to India through the Suez Canal. The Russians wanted Istanbul. The fabric of life in Jerusalem had begun to dissolve when governments, European and Ottoman, integrated daily life into their power politics. Perhaps it would have been better if they did not disrupt the actual status quo with the legal “status quo.” Jerusalem is one of the most important religious cities for the three monotheistic religions. It is home to thousands of religious, archaeological and historical sites that are sacred to billions of people around the world. Over the centuries, traditions and agreements between different religions and religious groups have been forged to define the rights of each religious group. The invention, and some disagreements about installing candles on it. However, the Orthodox are renouncing this practice. The Church of the Holy Sepulchre is coveted by most Christian denominations. It is considered a sacred place where the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ took place.

The Grand Vessir of the Ottoman Empire, Faud Pasha, did not simply demand discrimination against a minority religion. The great European Christian powers, Great Britain, Austria, France, Russia, suddenly decided that Jerusalem was a good place to outsource their rivalries. They had begun to part in disputes between various Christian denominations over the use of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the presumed place of the crucifixion and the tomb of Jesus. The religious policy of Jerusalem had acquired the potential to undermine the power of the Ottoman Empire, which had ruled Jerusalem since 1517. This potential for disputes over the use of holy sites in Jerusalem to disrupt established power is at the centre of a special exhibition at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, which I recently visited. The Ottomans tried to solve this problem by inventing the concept of “status quo”, and this concept was used by all the powers that still rule Jerusalem today.