Scottish Government Parenting Agreement

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Scottish Government Parenting Agreement

All the agreements you make in your parenting plan are voluntary. This means that a court cannot impose a decision if one of you does not comply. If parents or caregivers live in different homes and usually take turns caring for their children, they can continue to do so. Court decisions and formal agreements should be respected, unless there may be an agreement between parents or those with parental rights and obligations to change these rules. Establishing a parenting plan is a good way to do this and can also help prevent future differences of opinion on education issues. Financial rights and information for caregivers of a relative or family friend – by Citizens Advice Scotland. A special hotline is also available. Benefits, maternity rights in the workplace, housing options, rules for your children after separation and divorce, and custody of children. The “room tax” and child support. Whenever it is safe and possible, children enjoy positive relationships with both parents. They also provide support services, such as counselling services for children. When parents separate, children can feel vulnerable and in danger – that`s a big change. Some parents never live together.

If parents and caregivers have a more informal agreement, they should, according to the court guide, discuss how best to manage the situation and decide whether a child should move between homes after the circumstances are assessed. The guide also contains sections in which you can complete and sign if you wish. It may not be possible for contact to continue as is normally the case. In this situation, the courts expect regular contact to be organized and maintained by other means, for example. B by the change of location or by face-to-face, WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom or phone. Divorce rates are falling, but today there are more children born to single parents than married people. Meanwhile, of the 614,000 Scottish households with dependent children in 2011, almost one in three lived in an adult-headed household and about 56,000 were stepchildren. Information on the rights of children and young people in Scotland. Proof of age, discrimination, human rights, nationality and immigration, punishment, religion and voting. This brochure is aimed primarily at parents who separate or live separately. Information and guidance to citizens on children in care, including the reasons for housing children in child care, the rights of parents, decisions subject to compensatory measures and contact agreements.

Written with the help of family relations and family law experts, it draws on a similar resource for parents in Scotland, first published in 2006. The statement of the Scottish courts is here: guidelines on respect for the decisions of the family courts. All Scottish Courts updates during Covid-19 are available here. Clan Childlaw has written an update to Courts explaining what legal proceedings are underway here. The Scottish Executive has developed a series of Family Matters documents. These are available from www.scotland.gov.uk/familylaw, by email family.law@scotland.gsi.gov.uk or by phone on 0131 244 3581 part of the family business Parenting contract Not available separately You should ask your children what they think and feel about any changes that are taking place. Discuss new agreements with them so they can understand what is going on and why.